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Low Frequency Piezo Transducer Alternative

Updated: Apr 4, 2023

HASEL actuation technology from Artimus Robotics provides an excellent alternative to piezoelectric stack actuators because of the high actuation strain, low material cost, intelligent self-sensing, and lead-free material composition of HASEL actuator technology. Low-frequency piezo transducers use specialized materials like barium titanate and PZT ceramics that can contain lead, a substance banned by the RoHS directive in Europe, and these can break easily when deformed due to their brittle nature. HASEL actuators are made from inexpensive commodity materials and have soft compliant structures and a wide bandwidth of operation that is beneficial for haptics and sensation applications. HASEL actuators operate especially well in the low-frequency range (DC to 50 Hz) which is uncommon for many actuator technologies. This capability sets HASEL actuators apart from traditional haptics buzzers, such as piezo buzzers, eccentric rotating mass (ERM) motors, and linear resonance actuators (LRA). Additionally, HASEL actuators are highly controllable and easily customizable in shape, size, and materials, and can be made for millimeter-scale products. Low-frequency piezo transducers rely on stacking the individual layers of the piezo element (required to increase the tiny strains) so their customizability is very limited.


Want to learn more about HASEL actuators as a piezo alternative for low-frequency applications? Contact Artimus Robotics at info@artimusrobotics.com.



About Artimus Robotics

Artimus Robotics designs and manufactures soft electric actuators. The technology was inspired by nature (muscles) and spun out of the University of Colorado. HASEL (Hydraulically Amplified Self-healing ELectrostatic) actuator technology operates when electrostatic forces are applied to a flexible polymer pouch and dielectric liquid to drive shape change in a soft structure. These principles can be applied to achieve a contracting motion, expanding motion, or other complex deformations. For more information, please visit Artimus Robotics or contact info@artimusrobotics.com.


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