Are HASEL Actuators safe to touch?

Updated: Jan 31

HASEL actuators are a very unique way to make motion. The patented combination of flexible films, liquids, and high voltage provides diverse and controllable motion not previously seen in other technologies. (Learn more about how a HASEL actuator works here)


When customers learn about the use of high voltage, they often have concerns about safety. While HASEL actuators consume very low power (high voltage, low current device), there are many ways to mitigate these safety concerns (see this post on HV safety), so much so that some HASEL actuators can actually be designed to be safe to touch.



In this video, an example of an E-series (expanding) HASEL actuator is shown that is totally safe to touch even while actuating. While this demonstration is not yet approved for a consumer safety certification, it does highlight the potential of HASEL actuators to be near and in contract with people. This ability to touch, combined with organic, silent, and controllable motion, makes HASEL actuators a truly unique offering for human-machine interfaces, buttons, haptics, massage, and more.


If you are interested in learning more about the use of HASEL actuators on or near people, please reach out to info@artimusrobotics.com to learn more. Our Artimus Robotics Partnership Program is filling fast but we would love the opportunity to work with your business to explore new possibilities.


About Artimus Robotics

Artimus Robotics designs and manufactures soft electric actuators. The technology was inspired by nature (muscles) and spun out of the University of Colorado. HASEL (Hydraulically Amplified Self-healing ELectrostatic) actuator technology operates when electrostatic forces are applied to a flexible polymer pouch and dielectric liquid to drive shape change in a soft structure. These principles can be applied to achieve a contracting motion, expanding motion, or other complex deformations. For more information, please visit Artimus Robotics or contact info@artimusrobotics.com.


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